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sunto's Avatar

just looking for a little help as I am trying to get the right answer to a question even my old pal Google is not so forthcoming.

Question 

If I drop a 100kg 100mm how much dose the objects weight on impact . Travel distance is 100mm of gravity nowhere near terminal velocity.  Any one that can solve this and show me how to work it out I will be impressed.

Thanks in advance I wish I add listened school.

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kdc's Avatar

Where is Dr. Sheldon Cooper when we need him?

Kim L
David
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sunto's Avatar

It seems a simple question but its not something i have never been asked before its of interest know that speed or gravity adds a force which is equally to ?

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jdowney9000's Avatar

Maximum force on the object would be rated in weight units per area.

Maximum force = [(item weight + ((gravity pull - drag) * distance)) / area of contact surface]

To finish the calculation you will need "area of contact" and "drag".

David
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williamj's Avatargold

I don't know if you're asking the right question. The object would weigh, at impact, just as much as it did before it was dropped (100kg).

Are you asking for the "force" at impact? I forget how to calculate that, something about gravity, wind resistance and 32ft/sec squared... I think.  :  /

David
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sunto's Avatar

Hi  guys  the surface area let's say is 50mm I know it will still be 100kg in weight  what extra see it's not easy for me to explain you can ballance a potato on a sheet  of glass and it may take the weight but if you lift and drop the potato at increasing highest each time eventually the potato will break the glass

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williamj's Avatargold

I know it seems like we're splitting hairs but there is a difference between the weight of an object and the force at which it impacts with another object. It's not the weight of the potato that breaks the glass its the force at which it impacts the glass that determines whether or not the glass will break.

I tried posting some formulas from the net but I couldn't get it right. Here's the links I tried to copy from...

http://www.livephysics.com/tools/mechanics-tools/solve-problem-related-impact-force-falling-object/

Most of the formulas in the above link require velocity, that formula can be found at the link below.

http://www.physicsclassroom.com/class/1DKin/Lesson-5/How-Fast-and-How-Far

David
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sunto's Avatar

Well done  William so what is my answer it's all smoke and mirrors to a wood butcher.

The time it takes to hit the ground in a 100 mm free fall is hard for me to measure 

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williamj's Avatargold

David, I amended my post to include a couple of links.

Gotta go for now, will be back later.

David
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sunto's Avatar

Thanks for the input  will

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awildx's Avatargold

It'll weight 100kg.  The weight of the object never changes during this scenario.

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sunto's Avatar

Thanks adam we have agreed on its still is 100kg . Look like indeed to speak with some one that understands my Yorkshire way of thinking. It's my fault I cannot explain myself properly.

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enigmamusement's Avatargold

I imagine placing a weighing scale on the table and dropping a bowling ball on it. Only problem is I need a speed-capturing camera to catch the moment when it spikes - or maybe use a digital scale to catch that spiking moment - without damaging it of course ::  

David
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sunto's Avatar

I like you  Arthur. 

You  have  a practical brain .  It's  an interesting question but  no one seems to be able to answer  it on paper .  I have engineering friends that  are  not able to  help me . I may have to contact professional testing house the only way may be a practical hands on test . Thanks for the input Arthur.

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